SOUTH CAROLINE: WHERE YOU PAY TO WATCH PORN



By: Laura C. Anderson


South Carolina Republican Representatives, Bill Chumley and Mike Burns introduced a new piece of legislature to the House on January 10th, 2017. Naming it the Human Trafficking Prevention Act (HTPA), this proposed bill will require sellers to install porn filters on computers, tablets, and other devices sold in the state of South Carolina.  

State Rep. Bill Chumley

State Rep. Bill Chumley

According to the South Carolina Legislature, the HTPA “requires a business, manufacturer, wholesaler, or individual that manufactures, distributes, or sells a product that makes content accessible on the Internet to install and operate a digital blocking capability that renders obscenity inaccessible and to set minimum requirements for the blocking capability.”
The bill also aims to exclude access to any online smut site that facilities prostitution and would require manufacturers or sellers to block any websites that facilitate trafficking.

In much simpler terms, any device capable of accessing the Internet sold within South Carolina is mandated to have a porn filter built in. But being this is America, for a ‘small fee’ there’s a loophole. The proposed bill levies a $20 fee on those who wish to lift the filter and watch the porn they so admire. If you ask me, this is a burden for the customer more so than it is for the merchant.

The first time I read the legislature I pictured buyers themselves taking initiative when deciding whether or not to purchase a device allowing the viewing of obscene content. I immediately pictured some schmuck in a Wal-Mart in South Carolina buying a laptop and slyly slipping a $20 bill to the cashier with a look on his or her face that says, "You know what this is for."

Can we all just take a minute to really let that sink in? Imagine buying an iPhone at the Apple store and checking off a little box under your terms and conditions that reads, "Yes, l would like to pay the added fee of $20 so I can watch Pornhub during my lunch break in my car." 

Jokes aside, this piece of legislature really opens up a much larger conversation. According to the bill, the money generated from merchants and customers paying the ridiculous fee would go toward the state Attorney General’s human trafficking task force. According to the Human Trafficking Hotline, there were over 58 cases of sex trafficking reported in South Carolina in 2016. This bill aims to decrease that number significantly in future years. Though some experts laud the effort being taken on such a serious matter, they have their doubts about the bill’s ability to achieve the designated purpose.

This is one of those moments where you want to respond, “Um, duh?” 

More needs to be done in regards to sex trafficking, but making people pay $20 to unblock porn doesn’t seem to be the way to go. A fee that small in itself isn’t going to deter traffickers, and it’s ridiculous to assume it would. It also isn’t going to prevent people from verifying their age and clicking away on their beloved smut sites anyways. Though Chumley and Burns’ attempt at protecting children from exposure to sexually explicit material is admirable, there are arguably a few flaws in the bill’s blueprint. 


Laura C. Anderson | @s0mebl0nde


WHILE YOU'RE HERE, CHECK OUT SOME OF OUR OTHER FEATURES:


ABOUT SKYN

Contact Us                       Magazine Advertising                  Our Team                              Subscribe  

Careers                            Privacy Policy                               Clients & Affiliates                 Media Kit     

Model Safety                   Cookie Policy                               Services                             

CREATIVEDEMANDNETWORK

THISISEAMES | WHENLEFTWASRIGHT | ASHLEYHASSARD | CREATIVEDEMANDCO

© 2014 Creative Demand Network., All Rights Reserved